Friday, February 20, 2015

Bite prevention by Odin J.



Odin, Raven and I feel very strongly about bite prevention. We hope to network and educate to keep as many of our pets as safe as possible. We need to RESPECT how the animal feels. We need to teach our children to respect an animal’s personal space and treat them how we want to be treated. Pulling a kitty’s tail or running up to a strange dog and sticking your face in theirs, is not acceptable. We need to teach this to our future leaders, just like slapping your sibling or friend is not acceptable. I feel we need to be the voice for the animals who cannot speak for themselves! Below I have included an excerpt from my book “Furry Philosophy and Memoirs set in stone reintegrating this subject I feel is so very important.

“Odin is a VERY smart boy. Being smart does not mean that he does not have issues. Odin is very fearful of strangers especially men and children. I don’t know what his early life was like, as he was a rescue, before he came to me.
     A very wise trainer I have worked with in the past, said, “Don’t set your dog up for failure. You can work with him in safe situations, but don’t put him in a situation he cannot handle.”  Most of all she taught me to believe in Odin.
     I believe EDUCATON is a major factor in “Bite prevention.”  One of the reasons I started “Future Voices Kids Club” was to educate children. I did this because I wanted dogs like Odin to be safe.  If a child approaches a dog (or cat) without asking and does not know the proper way to approach the dog, it is unfair to the dog. If the dog is fearful, the dog does not know what to do except to protect itself. This is not the dog’s fault but lack of human education. Not only should the dog be trained but children should be trained as well.
     Sadly many pets end up in shelters or worse- euthanized for lack of education and the unwillingness of the owner to dedicate time to the dog and commit to training. One on one training with a kind trainer can be extremely beneficial. Learning helpful methods such as proper door greeting and how to send Odin to a safe “place” which is a rug Odin has learned to go to and has helped so much. This is his place where he can feel safe, that no one will touch him.  When teaching Odin to go to his “place” I was told to point to it. Well, Odin being the smart boy he is, has learned when I point at something , be it my glove I drop in the woods,  or any miscellaneous item , it means I want him to pick it up and hand  it to me . When we first started learning “place” I pointed to “place” and Odin promptly went and picked up the “place” (rug) and handed it to me. I guess he showed me, huh?
      We have tried many things to help Odin with his issues. I worked with several trainers, always making sure I stay kind, patient and constant and that the trainer is not being forceful, which I do not believe in. I have taken TTouch seminars to keep Odin’s energy even and relaxed and I’ve worked with energy workers. Not only have they helped Odin, but they’ve helped me to keep my energy balanced so I can help Odin with his. I also practice canine rally and other exercises to help Odin stay focused on looking to me for direction and trusting me.
       I believe whole heartedly this quote by Stacey O’Brien “To that which you tame, you owe your life”
It is our responsibility to do all we can to help our dogs with their issues and not just throw them away like garbage. After all WE are not perfect and WE have our own issues and no one throws us away.
Sometimes it is just not one solution, but a combination of many. Try to find the right formula that works for both of you as a TEAM!  I highly recommend if your dog has problems don’t ignore them, set them up for failure or lock them up. I suggest working with a reputable trainer; ask your friends or veterinarian for recommendations. Above all make sure your trainer is kind and does not try to use unnecessary force or shock collars as a solution. Combine methods like the ones I have mentioned. There are also many wonderful calming items like the “Thunder Shirt” and “Rescue Remedy” that can help aid your dog if it is distressed.
Have some fun with your dog and be the best dog owner you can. Don’t give up on their beautiful soul. After all they would never give up on you!”
Please join me in spreading the word about bite prevention and share Odin’s video on your Facebook, twitter or Instagram.
Together ONE BY ONE we CAN make a difference!!!!
See Odin's  Bite prevention movie at : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IUIdrfn87Q

Doggie and kitty kisses

Jodi, Odin and Raven

16 comments:

  1. Wonderful points - set your dog up for success and we owe them the care they deserve.

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  2. Funny, I just wrote something of similar nature but pertaining to dog-dog interaction. I have a dog who, through training, can handle a child running up to her screaming and throwing their arms around her neck (this literally happened when I took her with me to a pet-friendly store), but she can't handle another dog running up to her. I only take her to on-leash environments to set her up for success, but so many people forget to ask before they let their dog come up to us, that I'm constantly blocking other dogs from getting too close and causing her to fail. Maybe one day she'll be able to say "hi", but that day is not today.

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  3. I could not agree more. Have you heard of The Yellow Ribbon Project? I have been trying to raise awareness about that too - it helps children recognize that some dogs need exra space.

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    1. I have heard of the yellow ribbon, actually I was planning on doing a piece on the yellow ribbon too

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  4. This is very important. So many kids AND adults still have no idea how to act around dogs.

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  5. Great mission! If you haven't already, you may want to check out FamilyPaws.com and their Dogs & Storks programs along with the annual international educational event "Be A Tree" =)

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  6. Really great post. A lot of people are not well versed on how to treat animals these days. We cause a lot of harm to ourselves (and the animals) because of our lack of knowledge.

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  7. So much good information here. Sadly, I've heard too many tales of families with dogs that they didn't understand, and because of one thing or another a bite happened by an otherwise good dog, and the dog was euthanized. That just shouldn't happen. Your video should help many.

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    1. Thank you so much! You are right that should never happen!!!

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  8. Such an important topic. We need voices to educate adults and children how to treat animals.

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  9. Very important information. For dogs and humans to live together well, dogs need to learn (through training) and humans need to learn (through education). All animals need to be treated with kindness and understanding.

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  10. You are so right. It is so important that we teach dogs how to behave but also how humans can appropriately treat animals. Empathy for animals is paramount.

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  11. That O'Brien quote you've shared is right on! Yes, education is a key in dog behavior and biting issues. I walk my dog several times a day and finally have all the neighbors--adults--trained not to reach out and touch until I say it's okay. And my dog is not a biter, is very people friendly. My hope is that they've now learned to do this with all dogs, because it may save their hand or the dog's life if they do.

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    1. Good for you on teaching your neighbors . I am so happy to know someone who is as passionate about this as I am :)

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    2. Don't you just love when someone says, "Is he friendly as they stick their hand on his head!" Grrr!

      And, thank you for sharing your link on my blog hop!

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